Archaeologists discover 3,500-year-old Pharoah tomb in Egypt (VIDEO)

The ancient tomb was found near Luxor, one of the world's richest archaeological sites (stock photo)

The ancient tomb was found near Luxor, one of the world's richest archaeological sites (stock photo)

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

A team of Egyptian archaeologists has discovered a Pharoah tomb which is at least 3,000 years old - and contains eight mummies.

The ancient mausoleum, which is almost completely intact, also contains 10 coffins and around 1,500 statues. 

The tomb was found in Dra Abu al Naga, a settlement on the Western bank of the Nile near Luxor, and is thought to date back to the XVIII Pharoah dynasty, which ruled Egypt between 1500 and 1295BC. Archaeologists believe it belonged to a local judge.

"An Egyptian archaeological mission working in the Dra Abu al Naga necropolis on Luxor's west bank unearthed the funerary collection of a New Kingdom tomb of Userhat, the city juror," Dr. Mostafa Waziri, who heads up the research team, told Xinhua.

Built in a T shape, the tomb consists of an open patio, a rectangular hall, an internal chamber and a nine-metre well, which is connected to two rooms. 

Egypt's antiquities minister, Jaled al Anani, described the tomb as an "important discovery" because the collection of artefacts is almost completely undamaged. 

Video of the tomb has been published by Agence-France Presse and can be seen below:

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