Easter egg row is simply an attempt to make people feel guilty about not going to church, says National Secular Society

Easter egg row: 'This is an attempt to make people feel guilty about not going to church', says National Secular Society

Cadbury and the National Trust have been criticised

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Controversy around the Cadbury and National Trust egg hunt is nothing more than an attempt to make secular people feel guilty about not going to church, according to the National Secular Society.

Cadbury and the National Trust have been caccused of airbrushing faith for promoting an egg hunt without using the word Easter. Both parties have hit back at the claims, saying they do use the term Easter in other marketing.

Terry Sanderson, president of the National Secular Society, told Sam Delaney that the controversy seems to be "an attempt to guilt-trip us about not going to church."

He believes a commercial company should be able to run its marketing "in the way it wants to" and the issue has just been "worked up by the Church of England specifically to get publicity for their celebrations."

But the editor of Christian Today Ruth Gledhill argued that no one should feel guilty "except for Cadbury and the National Trust." She says there's nothing to be gained from omitting the word Easter, as "it’s become part of this country’s narrative" and offends nobody.

In fact, she believes “removing Easter for some fantastically paranoid fear of offending a member of another faith is completely counter-productive."

She also told us many people are outraged because Cadbury products are "well loved by so many people, many people feel a national ownership, they feel they have a stake in Cadbury."

Listen to the full audio above

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