Evidence of cannibalism dating back 10,000 years found in ancient Spanish cave

Evidence of cannibalism dating back 10,000 years found in ancient Spanish cave

Three skulls were found in the cave (Stock image)

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Evidence of cannibalism has been discovered in an ancient cave in Spain, dating back 10,000 years.

Researchers discovered human bones which are covered in marks, suggesting they were involved in "anthropophagic [cannibal] practices," according to Arstechnica.

Carbon dating on the artefacts has shown what appears to be two separate incidents of cannibalism, one 10,000 years ago and one 9,000.

Three skulls were found by the researchers - one was an infant which showed no signs of cannibalism, while the other two did show signs. But none of the three skulls showed signs of violence - suggesting they were eaten after death.

The bones appeared to show signs of human bite marks, cuts where tools were used to remove flesh and burnt areas.

It is not clear whether the people were eaten out of desperation or ritual, and it could have been part of a funeral. 

The research on the cave was published in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology by University of Valencia anthropologist Juan V. Morales-Pérez alongside other colleagues.

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