'Security services didn't watch Brit suicide bomber closely as he didn't plan a UK attack,' says terrorism expert

'Security services didn't watch Brit suicide bomber closely as he didn't plan a UK attack,' says terrorism expert

Ronald Fiddler is said to have detonated a car bomb (Stock image)

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Security services wouldn't have been watching suicide bomber Ronald Fiddler closely as his planned attack wasn't in the UK, says an expert from the Royal United Services Institute.

A British Islamic State fighter, who died this week in Mosul during a suicide bomb attack on Iraqi forces, is believed to be a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, whose release in 2004, and alleged £1m compensation award, was lauded in some quarters as a triumph for civil liberties campaigners. Isis said Abu-Zakariya al-Britani, formerly known as Ronald Fiddler, detonated a car bomb earlier this week.

RUSI Counter-terrorism expert Raffaello Pantucci told Julia Hartley-Brewer that security services "tend to focus on the individuals who are trying to launch attacks here at home," so you can "see how he might slip down the priority rankings" for being watched as he didn't seem to be planning anything here. 

Pantucci, who is Director of International Security Studies at RUSI, said since al-Britani, who was 50, "started his radical path in the Nineties" and has taken until 2017 to make "the ultimate decision, that is a long period of time to be paying attention to someone."

He also explained why al-Britani was never put on trial: "In this particular case it was impossible to try him because of things that had happened around his detention."

Listen to the full interview above

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