'Coffee protects against cancer in some cases', says Doctor Allinson after WHO report

'Coffee protects against cancer in some cases', says Doctor Allinson after WHO report

Coffee may help to reduce the risk of some cancers, it is thought

Thursday, June 16, 2016

A new World Health Organisation (WHO) study has revealed coffee doesn't increase the risk of cancer, despite previous claims. Doctor Sarah Allinson claims there never was sufficient evidence.

The report revealed coffee isn't a cause of bladder cancer, which had originally been suggested in 1991 – and in fact it may actually help reduce the risk of liver and womb cancer.

"There never really has been any evidence to suggest it was definitely cancer causing," Allinson told Jonny Gould and Ash.

"They did it 25 years ago for coffee, and at that time they classified it at class 2B, which meant its possibly cancer causing. But they needed to do a little more work. 25 years down the line, they've done that work.

"They actually found coffee protects against cancer in some cases."

The senior lecturer at Lancaster University says we need to remember cancer has various causes.

"[WHO] look at all of the evidence that's been published and they're completely independent so you don't have to worry about mixed messages.

"The important thing with all of these types of evaluations is its not just one thing that causes cancer.

"[We need to try] to figure out who's more likely to get what kind of particular cancers, if you can work that out you can target your messages appropriately."