Pay gap starts young as survey reveals boys get more pocket money than girls

Pay gap starts young as survey reveals boys get more pocket money than girls

Pocket money: How much you get depends on your gender

Friday, June 3, 2016

We all knew about gender pay inequality for grown-ups, but it appears that the financial gap between the sexes starts way before they enter the workforce. 

According to a survey undertaken by Halifax Bank, boys got up to 13 per cent more weekly pocket money than their female counterparts in the last year. 

The results were gathered from more than 1,200 children and 575 parents and found that on average children got £6.55, but parents gave boys aged between eight and 15 an average of £6.93 a week while girls received only £6.16.

Speaking on talkRADIO, Vicky Welton, who blogs about lifestyle and parenting, was concerned about the possible long-term impacts of the findings.

"I just think it's a really poor example to set for future generations," she told Julia Hartley-Brewer. "There's already a big uproar about the fact women earn less than men.

"But for it to come back to the youngest generation is poor."