'Advantages of driverless lorries can't be gained at the cost of safety', says Road Haulage Association

'Advantages of driverless lorries can't be gained at the cost of safety', says Road Haulage Association

We could soon see 'driverless lorries' on our roads

Friday, August 25, 2017

So-called "driverless lorries" will have a driver on board – but mustn't ever sacrifice safety, the Road Haulage Association has said.

The government has announced that partially driverless lorries will be tested on roads in the UK by the end of 2018. This involves up to three vehicles travelling in convoy with the lead controlling braking and acceleration.

Spokeswoman for the Road Haulage Association (RHA) Kate Gibbs told the Two Mikes: "These are not driverless trucks" as there will still be a driver on board, what we're actually talking about is "vehicle telematics."

Whilst she acknowledges this has been a success in European countries, she says "they have very different road networks to us, in that they’re long straight roads and they’re not as highly populated as in the UK."

Gibbs explained the advantages of using these lorries would be saving on fuel due to better aerodynamics and they will "save on emissions so it’s going to help the environment."

But she revealed "our biggest worry is that none of these advantages must be gained at the cost of safety" and the RHA "will want to be part of the consultation process and we will want go down into the details of the testing" such as what would happen if all three lorries aren't going to the same destination, or if a gap forms between them.

Listen to the full interview above