Archeologists discover 3,000-year-old ancient pharaoh statues in Cairo

Archeologists discover 3,000-year-old ancient pharaoh statues in Cairo

Two ancient pharaoh statues have been discovered (Stock image)

Friday, March 10, 2017

Archeologists have found two ancient pharaoh statues in a mud pit which are believed to be more than 3,000 years old.

They were discovered on Thursday (March 9) in a joint mission by German and Egyptian archeologists, between crumbling apartment blocks on wasteland in the Mattarya district, Cairo, according to Aljazeera.

It is believed that the statues represent pharaohs from the 19th dynasty, they ruled from 1314 to 1200 BC.

One of the pieces was created with quartzite, which is a stone made of quartz grains standing eight metres tall.

Although the statue was found at the entrance to the temple of King Ramses II, archeologists could not identify that it was made to represent him from the engravings, however its location has led them to believe it is most likely a depiction of him.

The second statue is made from limestone and is thought to be King Seti II, who ruled in the 12th century.

Dietrich Raue, head of the German team, said that the ancient statues will be lifted and taken to a new site to be restored.