Brexit: Report suggests Leave vote was 'cry of financial pain'

Brexit: Report suggests Leave vote was 'cry of financial pain'

A report from the University of Warwick conducted research into the reasons why people voted to leave

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

New research has found last year's Brexit vote was a “cry of financial pain” from members of the UK electorate who felt they were suffering economically.

Previously it was believed older voters and people in rural areas, driven by a fear of immigrants and globalisation, who drove the vote to leave the European Union.

Now a report from the University of Warwick has rejected this theory, saying it was concerns about austerity and the ongoing fallout from the global financial crash which governed voters' wishes.

The findings uncovered little difference between people aged 35, 55, or 75, and only the youngest offered heavy support for Remain.

The researchers said the key predictor for a leave vote was the feelings voters had about getting by financially, and how much difficulty they were having.

The report also found there were no overarching demographic factors between Leave and Remain voters, such as ethnicity, marriage status, parenthood, or employment.