Disabled children are ‘always at the bottom of the greasy pole of priorities’, says disability campaigner

Disabled children are ‘always at the bottom of the greasy pole of priorities’, says disability campaigner

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Campaigner Dan White from Department of Ability has said that disabled children always end up at the “bottom of the greasy pole of priorities” and a Minister for Disabled Children is a “necessity” to change this.

Disability charity Scope has made a petition calling for the UK Government to create a Minister for Disabled Children and Families to address the lack of opportunity for disabled children.

Mr White, the creator of a comic of disabled superheroes, told talkRADIO’s Matthew Wright: “You find that we are always at the bottom of the greasy pole of priorities.

“You seem to find that all the way through. It is about time we weren’t because our children are invaluable and they are absolutely brilliant.”

 

'Left in a minefield' 

Mr White said that parents of disabled children “have nowhere to turn” and that the role was a “necessity”.

“There is a necessity for a minister for disabled children. As I know from personal experience when your child was initially diagnosed with a disability through to birth, you are literally left in a minefield,” he said.

“You have nowhere to turn, no one to talk to. The NHS, and the doctors and nurses, do an absolutely fantastic job but there is a limit on what they can do.

“There needs to be a minister in Parliament that can network departments together to feed information to us.”

“When your child is diagnosed you are literally told of your child’s limitations, the negative aspects of life and the barriers you will face.”

 

'Medicinal stockpiling' 

Mr White added that Brexit was a concern for many parents as they read “negative stories about medicinal stockpiling”.

“There is a lot of fear through Brexit because there are a lot of negative stories about medicinal stockpiling,” he said.

“I have a lot of parents who are worried because they need certain medicines for their child’s essential care.

“They do not know whether they are going to have access to those medicines because no one is speaking to them.”