Dominic Raab: The UK is ‘being blackmailed and bullied into a flawed’ Brexit deal

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Monday, November 26, 2018

The former Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab has described the Prime Minister’s deal as “flawed”, adding that it “suffocates” the opportunities of free trade that Brexit brings. 

Writing in the Sun, Mr Raab said: “We are being blackmailed and bullied into a flawed deal. The EU has used the negotiations to stifle the opportunities and optimism that fired people up to vote Leave in 2016.

“In truth, there are risks in any course of action we take now. But, by far the gravest is to succumb to the EU’s terms, stay tethered to Brussels, and accept a deal that prevents us from becoming masters of our own destiny.”

The former Brexit Secretary resigned earlier this month as a response to Theresa May’s draft EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Mr Raab added: “Of course, the EU were never going to welcome Brexit. Some sour grapes were inevitable. That’s why we worked hard to leave on positive terms, extending the arm of friendship.

“In return, the EU has taken every concession and gesture of goodwill as a chance to try to bully and control us – at times treating our Prime Minister, and our country, with outright disdain.”

 

'Back to square one' 

On Monday, Mrs May is expected to tell MPs in the House of Commons to back her deal because there is no “better deal” available.

In a statement, Ms May will tell the Commons that rejecting her deal would lead to "more division and uncertainty".

She is set to add that rejecting the deal would take the country "back to square one".

Her statement follows Sunday's Brexit summit in Brussels, in which the 27 EU leaders approved the deal in less than 40 minutes.

The Prime Minister will need 318 votes in her favour in order for the deal to be backed by Parliament, but MPs from her own party, as well as her allies the DUP have already revealed plans to oppose the agreement.

It is expected that a vote on the deal in the Commons will take place the week beginning December 10.

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