Enniskillen bombing: victims' loved ones vow to continue fight for justice on 30-year anniversary

Enniskillen bombing: victims' loved ones vow to continue fight for justice on 30-year anniversary

The bombing killed eleven people during a remembrance day service

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Today marks the 30-year anniversary of the Enniskillen bombing, and the loved ones of the Enniskillen bombing victims have spoken publicly on their continued fight for justice.

The bombing was one of the most infamous attacks committed by the Irish Republican Army during the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

The device placed in the County Fermanagh town exploded on November 8, 1987 during a Remembrance Sunday memorial service.

The explosion killed 11 people and injured dozens more.

A 12th individual died in 2000 after spending 13 years in a coma from injuries obtained in the blast.

As of 2017, no individuals have been held to account for the bombing in Enniskillen.

Joan Anderson – who lost her parents William and Agnes Mullan in the attack – said after three decades she could accept what had happened, but could never forget it, continuing to remain angry.

Stella Robinson, who also lost her parents Wesley and Bertha Armstrong in the bombing, said people born after the Trouble or 1996 – the year in which a ceasefire was implemented – were not educated about what had happened.

She said she didn’t want the incident to be forgotten about, saying she had been robbed of 30 years with her parents.

The families of the victims, as well as local representatives, are to attend a memorial event on Wednesday at the location where the bomb detonated.