Hurricane Hermine - inside America's latest deadly storm

Hurricane Hermine - America's latest deadly storm
Hurricane Hermine - America's latest deadly storm
Hurricane Hermine - America's latest deadly storm
Hurricane Hermine - America's latest deadly storm
Hurricane Hermine - America's latest deadly storm

We look at the the latest hurricane to batter the shores of the United States

Friday, September 2, 2016

Hurricane Hermine is the latest hurricane to capture global media attention as the superstorm makes landfall in northern Florida. 

The southern part of America and the Gulf of Mexico have been battered by some of the strongest storms in history - Wilma, Rita, Sandy, and Katrina all notable examples. 

But why has this hurricane - by no means the most powerful at its ranking at a Category One on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale - dominated so much of the media's attention?

Well, it's the first hurricane to hit Florida in 11 years. The last hurricane to strike the state was Wilma, which made landfall in October of 2005, the same year as Katrina blitzed New Orelans. Wilma caused five deaths, an estimated $23bn (£17bn) of damage, and was the most intense storm ever recorded in the Atlantic. 

Early this morning, the hurricane made landfall southeast of Florida's capital of Tallahassee, bringing with it a storm surge of more than three feet and winds of up to 80 miles per hour. Damage to the area was described as "severe," with flooding leaving more than 70,000 homes without power - according to Tallahassee state officials. 

Hermine is expected to move through the states of Georgia, North and South Carolina, touch the coast of Virginia, before remaining immobile off the coast of New Jersey and New York.

As a result of this predicted path, a number of states along the east coast of America have been put on high alert:

The sheer number of areas affected contributes to a wide possibility of damage across the towns and cities along the coast - most of which will be areas of low-lying infrastructure. While a current estimate of costs isn't known, it's likely to be in the millions of dollars. 

Residents across the states - particularly in the directly affected areas - have been urged to travel inland before the hurricane hits. While most will have heeded a warning, others will have been out in force to prepare for landfall - stocking up on batteries, food, water, flashlights, and other necessary utilities to weather a heavy storm. 

It is, after all, a constant factor in their lives - preparing for the yearly storms which could destroy everything they have.