Justin Trudeau apologises for historical discrimination against LGBT community in Canada

Justin Trudeau apologises for historical discrimination against LGBT community in Canada

Justin Trudeau said Canada should not forget its past

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

The Prime Minister of Canada has apologised for historical discrimination against the LGBT community.

Justin Trudeau  said: "It is with shame and sorrow, and deep regret for the things we have done, that I stand here today and say: 'We were wrong. We apologise. I am sorry. We are sorry.'

"While we may regard modern Canada as a forward-thinking and progressive nation, we cannot forget our past."

The Prime Minister made the statement in parliament and those present applauded him for it, the BBC reported.

When the Cold War took place hundreds of men and women who were gay were removed from their positions in both the military and the government.

The military believed that gay people would be vulnerable to blackmail as they could be questioned about their sex life and asked to reveal information about others they knew were gay. This was described by Trudeau as a witch-hunt.

The current government has now announced that C$100 million (£58 million) will be set aside for a lawsuit filed by LGBT victims.

The Prime Minister has also announced a bill suggesting that courts should be able to remove records of people criminalised for being gay.

He has said that more must be done to stop discrimination on blood donation, and HIV sufferers must not be punished for not coming forward about the condition.

Discrimination policies in the military in Canada were removed in 1992 and in 1996 the human rights act in the country was made to include sexual orientation. This year gender orientation and gender identity were added.

Comments