Kensington and Chelsea Council apologises for asking resident to remove green Grenfell hearts from her home

Kensington and Chelsea Council apologises for asking resident to remove green Grenfell hearts from her home

Friday, September 21, 2018

Kensington and Chelsea have apologised to Sue Duggins after asking her to remove her green Grenfell hearts from her wall, classing them as graffiti.

Sue Duggins was asked to remove the hearts from her wall on the seventh floor by the Council on Thursday.

Sue Duggins said on Twitter: “I just had a call from RBKC telling me to take the green hearts off my wall as they are classed as graffiti!

“I am seven floors up. What do they class covering a building in flammable material as? I asked.

“Told them I would take it off in the time it takes them to get all my repairs done.”

Kensington and Chelsea Council responded to Ms Duggins tweet saying that it “was wrong of” them, and they know how important the symbol of the green heart is.

They tweeted: “We’re extremely sorry that you were asked to remove the green hearts, as this was wrong of us.

“We know what an important symbol the green heart is and what it means to the community affected by Grenfell.

“Thank you very much for notifying us.”

 

'They have so much to learn’

Ms Duggins has since been told by the Council that the hearts can stay up. 

She tweeted: “RBKC have rung and apologised.

“Told me I can leave the hearts. They have so much to learn.”

The green heart has become synonymous with the group Grenfell United, who campaign for justice for the 72 residents who died in the fire on June 14, 2017.

For the one year anniversary of the Grenfell fire, a banner with a green heart and the phrase "Grenfell, forever in our hearts" was unveiled a the top of the tower. 

The tower has since been fully covered, but the banner and green heart remains. 

Read more: Woman receives hate mail slating Grenfell victims after displaying 'United for Grenfell' poster

Read more: Former Kensington council worker pleads guilty to defrauding Grenfell fund