New lottery game to pay out winnings in monthly instalments over 30 years

New lottery game to pay out winnings in monthly instalments over 30 years

The new lottery game will pay out as much as £10,000 over 30 years.

Friday, January 11, 2019

A new lottery game has been launched that delivers the top prize in monthly payments over 30 years, rather than in one hit, offering "stability" to the winner.

The National Lottery's Set For Life game, launching in March this year, offers £10,000 per month for three decades if a ticket-holder matches all five main numbers and a Life Ball.

Lottery operator Camelot said it was the first "annuity" style draw-based game they had introduced in the UK, noting these games had proved popular overseas.

"It appeals to a different kind of player," a spokesman said.

"There are a good number of people who like the stability of regular monthly payments."

Camelot said the game could be particularly appealing to younger people, who might see it as a way to "upgrade" their lifestyle and try new things.

"They could really relate it to their bucket list of experiences they have," the spokesman said.

"They could also relate it to their salaries. They could see how it could upgrade their current lifestyle."

 

'We hope no one dies after winning' 

The top prize payments would not be adjusted for inflation over time but would be a fixed sum, Camelot said.

Players will pick five numbers from one to 47 and a Life Ball from one to 10, with prizes beginning from £5 for matching two numbers.

If a player matches five numbers without the Life Ball, they win £10,000 per month for one year.

Major winners would be provided with individual legal and financial advice, including on what would happen if they died before the 30 years were up.

"We hope no one dies after winning Set For Life," the spokesman said.

"But they would be told the implications of what would happen."

He said the remaining value of the annuity would go into the estate of the winner if they died.

The National Lottery, operated by Camelot, raises money for good causes and has delivered £39 billion in grants since launching in 1994.

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