Plea for "perspective" as government looks to crack down on airport boozing

A trade body has insisted it's important to "keep the problem in perspective" after figures showing more than 440 people have been held on suspicion of being drunk in an airport or on an aeroplane in the last two years prompted a government review on the way alcohol is served at airports.

How much is too much?

Friday, July 29, 2016

A trade body has insisted it's important to "keep the problem in perspective" after figures showing more than 440 people have been held on suspicion of being drunk in an airport or on an aeroplane in the last two years prompted a government review on the way alcohol is served at airports. 

New aviation minister Lord Ahmad will be looking at the times alcohol is on sale and how outlets operate. 

But Kate Nicholls, the chief executive of the Association of Licensed Multiple Retailers (ALMR), insists more evidence is needed before legislation is introduced. 

"These are very small, isolated incidents. We have to be careful to keep them in perspective," she told Yasmeen Khan

"I wouldn't like to see legislation brought in unless there is evidence of a problem.

"We do have to make sure people are taking responsibility for their own actions. 

"We have to have an approach that looks not just at what they're buying in a pub or restaurant, but what they are doing in the whole airport environment."

Sean Tipton, from the Association of British Travel Agents, had earlier told Julia Hartley-Brewer that part of the problem revolved around individuals not understanding the gravity of the situation. 

"People need to be aware of the penalities if they get drunk onboard a flight," he said.

"If people get drunk and abusive on a plane, it's [not only] very unpleasant for everyone else on board, but also it's quite dangerous. 

"You're liable financially if there is a problem. The penalties are great and people need to be made more aware of them."

Listen to the full interview to find out more