Police in Alaska back their right to sexual contact with sex workers before arresting them

Cops in Alaska back their right to sexual contact with sex workers before arresting them

The bill would ban any kind of contact with sex workers (stock photo) being investigated

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Policemen in Alaska have defended their so-called 'right' to engage in sexual contact with sex workers before placing them under arrest. 

Prostitution and other forms of sex work are illegal in Alaska, as is the case for 48 other states.

But a debate is ongoing over a bill moving through the Alaskan House of Representatives in Juneau which - if enacted - would ban officers from taking part in any sexual act with sex workers they intended to take into custody.

Advocates of the bill in the house have claimed that, by setting up the sex workers and catching them in the act, police are actually violating their human rights and abusing their authority.

The police officers' counterclaim is this legislation would prevent them from successfully conducting undercover operations. 

They claim it would allow the people they were investigating to "cop check", allowing them to test their reactions to see what they can and can't do.

It is expected the bill will still be in circulation by the time of the 2018 legislating session.