Trevor Sinclair: Former Manchester City and West Ham star pleads guilty to drink-driving and racially aggravated public order offence

Trevor Sinclair pleaded guilty to drink-driving and racially aggravated public order offence

Trevor Sinclair played for England in the 2002 World Cup

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Former England footballer Trevor Sinclair has been ordered to carry out 150 hours' community service and given a 20-month drink-driving ban, after admitting drink-driving and a racially aggravated public order offence against a police officer.

The offence took place in Blackpool on November 12, 2017 and Sinclair pleaded guilty earlier today (January 2).

Local newspaper the Blackpool Gazette, citing court proceedings, claims Sinclair asked the arresting officer if he was being detained because he was black, then accused the police of racism before finally urinating in a police car.

It is also claimed that Sinclair, a patron of anti-racism charity Kick It Out, continued being racist after being taken to Blackpool Police Station, where he was held.

Sinclair's lawyer Nick Freeman claims Sinclair's behaviour was the direct result of a racist insult directed at the former winger earlier in the evening.

According to Freeman, a woman approached Sinclair earlier in the evening and called him "a little chocolate man."

Sinclair, who also played for Blackpool, QPR and West Ham United, earned 12 caps for England and starred at the World Cup in 2002.

The 44-year-old has worked as a pundit, mainly for the BBC, since retiring from football 10 years ago.