Turkey: 'It's starting to look like a wider power grab, a crackdown on all opposition'

'It's starting to look like a wider power grab, a crackdown on all forms of opposition' - Journalist on the Turkey post-coup purge

A Turkish soldier suspected of being a part of the coup is arrested in Istanbul

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

The on-going purge in the aftermath of last week's attempted coup in Turkey is 'starting to look like a power grab' by the country's president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, an expert has claimed.

Last weekend, the Turkish leader survived a potential uprising from a group within the country's military.

More than 50,000 people have since been arrested, sacked, or suspended across the military, judiciary, and education sectors because they have been deemed to be 'disloyal' to Erdoğan.

Patrick Kingsley, foreign correspondent for The Guardian, explained how suspicions are rising that the president is using the coup to his own advantage.

'"The Erdoğan government is saying the plotters are linked to a secretive, dissident Islamist underground movement run by an Islamic cleric called Fethullah Gulen," he told Julia Hartley-Brewer.

"They're saying all these thousands of people are potentially linked to them. 

"What doesn't really make sense is in the same breath they're [also] saying the plotters were a small military faction which didn't have widespread support. Yet they're mounting this extraordinarily vast purge.

"What it really is starting to look like is a wider power grab, a crackdown on all forms of opposition.

"It underlines concerns rooted in Turkey that President Erdoğan wants to grab more power for himself and his allies."

Listen to the full interview above

Comments